Archive for the ‘Self-Management’ Category

In 100 Words: Bring Others With You (Change Spark-Part 2)

Wednesday, November 1st, 2017 by AdvisorCatalyst

How often do you coach, demand or incentivize people you lead to change? Stop these efforts – at least until you lead by example and change some of your own behaviors. Often leaders simply forget the power of example. Change is hard. When you change one or more your own ingrained habits the message is powerful and persuasive. Your call to action now has the ring of authenticity; of integrity. You demonstrate what it takes to fight through present discomfort for a better future outcome. Your example may be the spark others need to join you on a habit changing journey.

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” Leo Tolstoy

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: Being Present

Monday, August 1st, 2016 by AdvisorCatalyst

How well do you concentrate your mental and emotional faculties on the situation at hand? Can you tell when someone else in a conversation is “miles away?” Here are four reasons why being present is a difficult skill to do well in our person-to-person interactions:

• we are naturally self vs. others focused
• we allow distractions (phones, email, etc.)
• we aren’t emotionally invested
• our minds wander

If we cultivate the mindset of being present we will have greater impact in the current situation. More importantly, we send people the message that they, and the tasks at hand, are important.

“The mind is never satisfied with the objects immediately before it, but is always breaking away from the present moment…” Samuel Johnson

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: The Adversity Advantage

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016 by AdvisorCatalyst

Great accomplishments have a history of adversity. Our response when asked the question, “When have you grown the most in your career?” is frequently connected to times we were stretched to an uncomfortable level. The struggle of adversity is likely to produce stronger personal character as well as better performance. Character growth is seen in the form of greater personal humility, more graciousness toward others, and increased work ethic. Performance improvement comes through investing extra effort, developing our skills and figuring out new solutions. In the end, adversity provides the necessary edge to accomplish more than we first thought possible.

“There is no education like adversity.” Benjamin Disraeli

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: Success > Satisfaction > Stagnation

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016 by AdvisorCatalyst

Success is challenging to sustain. I believe one key reason for this stems from the cycle indicated in the headline. Too often we lose intensity when we are experiencing success – we become too satisfied. Here are two disciplines I use to help maintain my intensity and desire to keep setting and accomplishing new objectives:

• Purpose – focusing on the WHY of my work motivates me to keep improving because I realize my work is far from complete.

• Pace – alternating my periods of production intensity with meaningful downtime keeps me from flaming out and exhausting my resources.

How do you maintain intensity?

“The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease.” Nathaniel Hawthorne

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: The Overreaction File

Monday, February 1st, 2016 by AdvisorCatalyst

We have all seen people overreact. We usually think, “Easy…, it’s not that important.” If we’re honest, though, we overreact ourselves at times. This is especially common with our first (often too quick) response in stressful circumstances – irritation and frustration boil over. Abraham Lincoln exercised a unique habit in moments of frustration – he vented by writing a scathing letter which he promptly filed in a drawer and never sent. Do you have a file for your initial responses in testy situations? Favorable outcomes are more likely when we take time to settle our minds and emotions before replying.

“Let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger” The Epistle of James 1:19, The Holy Bible (ESV)

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: The Snare of Easy Success

Saturday, October 31st, 2015 by AdvisorCatalyst

In any endeavor – academics, athletics, career or business – performing at the top is exhilarating! However, if success comes too quickly and easily, a deceptive snare is laid – blindness to the need to improve. The motivation to form healthy work and learning habits is missing. It’s simply a matter of time until performance peaks out.

Remaining a top performer – sustaining success over time – requires continuous growth and work. Life is a progression, not a single event. The factors influencing achievement are constantly shifting, so only deliberate improvement prepares us for more challenging future pursuits and enables us to elude the snare.

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.” Benjamin Franklin

Click here if you would like “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: Too Satisfied?

Friday, September 13th, 2013 by AdvisorCatalyst

We extol the virtues of satisfaction, and rightly so.  Satisfied employees and customers are key to our organization’s success.  Is there such a thing as being too satisfied?  Yes, in ourselves, and our organizations, it is known as complacency.  Ouch!

We like to be comfortable.  It’s not easy to push ourselves to keep learning, growing and improving.  Dissatisfaction seems to have a negative connotation, yet it can be highly productive – exciting people to right injustices or simply improve situations that are less than great.

Where have you become too satisfied and comfortable in your own life, work, habits and thinking?

“Don’t let your special character and values, the secret that you know and no one else does, the truth – don’t let that get swallowed up by the great chewing complacency.”      (Aesop)

Click here to have “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share

In 100 Words: Debrief Discipline

Friday, August 2nd, 2013 by AdvisorCatalyst

Leaders should step back to analyze success or failure at the end of a project or goal period.  “Did we achieve the objective?”  “Have we identified root causes?”  “What role, if any, did fortune play in the final results?”  The simple rigor of capturing lessons learned improves future decisions and actions.  Debriefs often prove to be our most fertile ground for adaptive learning.

We neglect debriefs because we are:

  • Forgetful… sad, but true.
  • Too Busy… we think.
  • Too Excited… by whatever new objective lies ahead.
  • Avoiding Reality… it’s difficult acknowledging failures.

Instead, nurture a debrief discipline for your future benefit.

“Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn.”  (Benjamin Franklin)

Click here to have “In 100 Words” delivered to your inbox twice each quarter.

Share